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Office Space

“Your soul – that inner quiet space – is yours to consult. It will always guid you in the right direction.” Wayne Dyer

This is my place where I go to get away from it all, and hear myself think. I enjoy a little alone time, and time to write with no interruptions. A little time to contemplate or read a book. IMG_9736

Antique items and art abound in my personal space. My super comfy chair, and my huge renaissance desk are where I pay the bills and get stuff done. I can even have visitors that can talk to me while I am at my desk, or they can visit in a more intimate spot.

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My reception area has chairs, and a love seat where my visitors can sit and talk. I wanted to make sure I had plants that could clean the air and make my little area alive.

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This is my little space that makes me happy! I love the days I’m in there working, but I also love it when my husband comes to get me, when he thinks I’ve been here too long.

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Countess Maud Herbert

“Whoever leads an auspicious life here and governs the commonwealth rightly, as my most noble father did, who promoted all piety and banished all ignorance, has a most certain way to heaven.” Henry the VIII of England

Countess Maud Herbert is my 16th Great Grandmother, she is from the Alda Tribble line in our family tree.

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Maud Herbert, Countess of Northumberland was born in 1448 at Pembroke, Pembrokeshire, Wales and died circa 27 July 1485. She was buried in Beverley Minster, Beverley, East Riding of Yorkshire, England, UK [1] [2].

Parents: William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke1 b. 1423 and Anne Devereaux1 b. between 1436 and 1442, d. 1486

Married: Henry Percy (1446-14899), 4th Earl of Northumberland, son of Henry Percy, 3rd Earl of Northumberland and Alianore, Lady Poynings.

Children: Eleanor Percy, Duchess of Buckingham b. 1470, d. 13 Feb 1530.

Citations:

  1. [S1388] Tudor Place, online http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/index.htm, Herbert1.
  2. [S1388] Tudor Place, online http://www.tudorplace.com.ar/index.htm, Herbert1, 27 Jul 1485/1495.
  3. Find A Grave Memorial # 101559676.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Henry_Percy,_4th_Earl_of_Northumberland

At some time between 1473 and 1476 Percy married Maud Herbert (1448 – 27 July 1485/1495), a daughter of William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke (1423-1469) by his wife Anne Devereaux. They had eight children:

Henry Percy, 5th Earl of Northumberland (14 January 1478 – 19 May 1527), who married Catherine Spencer. Alianore Percy, Duchess of Buckingham[4] (d. 1530), wife of Edward Stafford, 3rd Duke of Buckingham. Sir William Percy (d. 15 September 1540), who married firstly Agnes Constable and secondly Margaret Soothill, widow of Sir John Normanville. Alan Percy (born 1479), Master of St John's College, Cambridge Josceline Percy (1480–1532), who married Margaret Frost. Arundel Percy (1483–1544). Anne Percy, Countess of Arundel (27 July 1485 – 1552), second wife of William FitzAlan, 18th Earl of Arundel. Elizabeth Percy.
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Maud Percy, Countess of Northumberland’s Timeline

1448
1448
Raglan, Pembrokeshire, Wales
1450
1450
Age 2
Monmouthshire, England, United Kingdom
1470
1470
Age 22
Alnwick, Northumberland, England
1474
1474
Age 26
Leconfield, Yorkshire, England
1477
January 13, 1477
Age 29
Leconfield, Yorkshire, England
1480
1480
Age 32
Leconfield, Yorkshire, England
1481
1481
Age 33
Leconfield, Yorkshire, England
1483
1483
Age 35
Leconfield, Yorkshire, England

 

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Henry Percy, 4th Earl of Northumberland

“History remembers the celebrated, genealogy remembers them all.” Laurence Overmire

My 16th Great Grandfather, starting from my grandfather and his mother, Alda Tribble.

 

HENRY PERCY, fourth Earl of Northumberland (1446-1489), was the only son of Henry Percy, third earl. On his father’s attainder, Edward IV committed him to safe keeping, and three years later conferred the forfeited earldom of Northumberland on John Neville, lord Montagu. Percy’s imprisonment cannot have been very strict, for in 1465 he was confined in the Fleet, where he made the acquaintance of John Paston (1421-1466), a fellow-prisoner (Paston Letters, ii. 237,243).

His subsequent transference to the Tower may be attributed to the Nevilles when they held the king in durance after the battle of Edgecott in 1469. One of Edward’s first steps on shaking off this constraint was to release Percy (27 Oct.), merely exacting an oath of fealty. When the final breach with the Nevilles came in the following spring, and the king drove the Earl of Warwickout of the realm, he took the earldom of Northumberland from Lord Montagu, and restored it (25 March at York) to Percy, who had accompanied him throughout the campaign. The new earl also superseded his disgraced rival in the wardenship of the east march towards Scotland, which had usually been held by the head of his house. This he lost again in the autumn, when the Nevilles restored Henry VI, and though Northumberland made no open resistance to the change of government, and could not very well be deprived of his newly recovered title, the Lancastrian traditions of his family did not blind him to the fact that for him it was a change for the worse.

On landing in Yorkshire in the following spring, Edward is said to have exhibited letters, under Northumberland’s seal, inviting him to return; and though he ‘sat still’ and did not join Edward, his neutrality was afterwards excused, as due to the difficulty of getting his Lancastrian followers to fight for York, and was held to have rendered ‘notable good service’ to the cause by preventing Montagu from rousing Yorkshire against the small Yorkist force. Twelve days after the battle of Barnet, Northumberland was created chief justice of the royal forests north of Trent by the triumphant Edward, and, after Tewkesbury, he was made constable of Bamborough Castle (5 June) and warden of the east and middle marches (24 June).

In the parliament of August 1472, the first held by Edward since his restoration of the earldom to Percy, the attainder of 1461 was formally abrogated. Shortly after the opening of the session Northumberland was appointed chief commissioner to treat with the Scots. Two years later he entered the order of the Garter, and was made sheriff of Northumberland for life. In 1475 he was given a colleague in his wardenship, in order that he might accompany the king in his expedition to France, and his presence is noted by Commines at the interview between Louis XIand Edward at Pecquigny. He led the van in the Duke of Gloucester‘s invasion of Scotland in June 1482, and Berwick, then recovered, was entrusted to his keeping.

Richard of Gloucester, when he assumed the protectorship, was careful to conciliate Northumberland by renewing his command as warden of the marches and captain of Berwick. A few weeks later the earl had no scruples in recognising Richard as king, and bore the pointless sword, curtana, the emblem of royal mercy, before him in the coronation procession. The office of great chamberlain of England, which the Duke of Buckingham forfeited by rebellion in October, was bestowed upon Northumberland (30 Nov. 1483), together with the lordship of Holderness, which had long belonged to the Staffords, and formed a desirable addition to the Percy possessions in Yorkshire. Richard gave him many offices of profit, and lands valued at nearly a thousand a year. Parliament restored to him all the lands forfeited by the Percy rebellions under Henry IV and not yet recovered.

Next to the Duke of Norfolk‘s, Richard bid highest for Northumberland’s loyalty. But he was not more ready to sink or swim with Richard than he had been with Edward. Some months before he landed in England, Henry of Richmond had entertained a suggestion that he should marry a sister-in-law of Northumberland. When the crisis arrived the earl obeyed Richard’s summons, and was at Bosworth, apparently in command of the right wing, but his troops never came into action; and, if Polydore [Vergil] may be believed, he would have gone over early in the battle had Richard not placed a close watch upon him.

Northumberland was taken prisoner by the victor, but at once received into favour and soon restored to all his offices in the north, and employed in negotiations with Scotland. In the spring of 1489 he was called upon to deal with the resistance of the Yorkshiremen to the tenth of incomes demanded for the Breton war. On 10 April he was appointed commissioner, with the archbishop of York and others, to investigate and punish the disturbances in York at the election of mayor in the previous February. Towards the end of the month he was alarmed by the attitude of the people in the vicinity of his manor of Topcliffe, near Thirsk, and on Saturday, 24 April, wrote to Sir Robert Plumpton from Seamer, close to Scarborough, ordering him to secretly bring as many armed men as he could to Thirsk by the following Monday. On Wednesday, 28 April, having gathered a force estimated at eight hundred men, he came into conflict with the commons, whose ringleader was one John a Chamber, near Thirsk, at a place variously called Cockledge or Blackmoor Edge, and was slain at the first onset. It was at first reported that he had gone out unarmed to appease the rebels. Some affirmed that over and above the immediate cause of collision the commons had not forgiven him for his conduct to Richard, who had been very popular in Yorkshire. Bernard Andreas wrote a Latin ode of twelve stanzas on his death, and Skelton wrote an elegy in English. He was buried in the Percy chantry, on the north side of the lady-chapel of Beverley Minster, where his tomb, from which the effigy has disappeared, may still be seen.

By his wife, Maud Herbert, daughter of William Herbert, first earl of Pembroke of the second creation, whom he married about 1476, he left four sons —Henry Algernon (1478-1527), his successor in the earldom; Sir William Percy; Alan; and Josceline, founder of the family of Percy of Beverley — and three daughters: Eleanor, wife of Edward Stafford, duke of Buckingham(beheaded in 1521); Anne, married (1511) to William Fitzalan, earl of Arundel (1483-1544); and Elizabeth, who died young.


 

Source:

Tait, James. “Henry Percy, Fourth Earl of Northumberland.”
The Dictionary of National Biography. Vol XLIV. Sidney Lee, Ed.
New York: Macmillan and Co., 1895. 408-409.

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College Bound

“There are far, far better things ahead than any we leave behind.” C. S. Lewis

My baby is now a senior in high school. We recently went on a search for a college for what she wants to do. She loves playing polo, and has scored several goals. They won state, and went to nationals.

Here are some photos of her playing…

The team recently made the polo magazine…

We went to visit serval campuses, but my favorite was Stanford. What a beautiful place. Here are a few photos from our weekend of searching.

We are looking forward to visiting southern California campuses.

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Working…

“Opportunity is missed by most people because it is dressed in overalls and looks like work.” Thomas Edison

So, I haven’t been able to write in so long because we have 9 baby goats. Four of the babies were not able to nurse from their mothers, so we had to bottle feed them. Getting up extra early to make baby bottles, and venturing out to feed each one. We hold each one in our lap, and give them a bottle. This occurs first thing in the morning, afternoon, evening, and at nightfall. As they have grown we can cut back, and now they are all at one whole bottle per day. We do a half feeding in the morning, and one at night.

Now, I start to get my life back to being close to normal. We still have one more pregnant goat. Her sister gave birth to a beautiful black female. We hope that the sister will give birth to another female, but we will have to wait for a few more days before we find out what she is carrying.

We also have to run the winery, and plan a few weddings. Not weddings of our own, but people that want to get married at the winery.

Our son is about to graduate from high school, and our daughter will graduate next year. So many things happening…we are growing in so many directions. Here are some photos of our baby goats.

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Christine George

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I have several paintings of horses, but this is one of my favorites. A knight sits astride the beautiful palomino. The gleaning of the metal in juxtaposition to the chestnut color of the body of the horse. The sunlight gleams on the metal, and right in the center of the shield for the horse is a sunburst. The golden yellow seems to have it’s own light, which then brings the eye of the spectator to the eye of the horse. Now, the eye of the spectator and the horse are locked…since the eye of the horse is gently looking back at the viewer. The eye of the viewer then follows the elbow up to the top of the canvas. The red color brings the eye back to the bottom of the canvas, looking at the blanket. Christine has done an excellent job of allowing a nice flow for the spectator. the eye is wandering around the canvas, and finding another aspect of the painting that went unnoticed the last time it was viewed. This painting hangs in our family room. The hose peeking at us while we are on the couch. I often find myself checking in on the horse and rider, but let’s not kid ourselves this painting is all about the horse.

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Oso Libre

My husband and I met Chris through another friend. We knew him before we owned a winery ourselves. Roberto and Chris took a trip to our 500 acre ranch, where Chris fell in love with our land. He uses the land for his cows. His cows run on the ranch before they go on to become his famous angus burgers.

His family got the name Oso Libre (which means free bears) from their name… Chris and Linda Behr and one of his sons Jeff Freeland and his wife Elizabeth…with the blend they came up with Oso Libre…pretty cool!

I can personally attest to the quality of the wines. One of my favorites, is the 2014 Volado Viognier, it’s crisp, and dry, yet refreshing. I believe every time I have been over to visit I have to purchase a bottle of it. It goes so well with chicken or fish. Although it is fantastic when paired with a meal, it is good enough to stand alone.

The tasting room is beautifully decorated, and the ambiance is warm and inviting. It is refined elegance! The staff welcomes everyone that comes through the doors.