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Another Graduate…

“The future belongs to those who believe in the beauty of their dreams.” Elenor Roosevelt

Just a few weeks ago, my daughter ask me to send her several options of baby photos for the year book. The year book that will be her final year book as a child. As I sat at my desk with the several photo albums, I just cried. My baby is almost an adult. She will be off to college next year.

She was such a beautiful little baby too…

All these years of watching my beautiful baby become her own person. I will never forget when she was told by the dentist that she had to have braces. She said “I like the way I look, the gap in my teeth make me, me. I don’t understand why I have to adapt to what society considers beautiful.” Oh, wow, I had to dig deep to find a damn good explanation for braces.

She also was so brave to just be herself. She has never needed approval from her friends, and I always commended her for being Sabrina. Through the years she was often the friend of the newest kids in the class. She knows that her family is with her on her journey whatever it is she decides to do, we know that she will do it unequivocally her way! I love my gown up baby, and having her in our lives has been a blessing. I love the times we have spent together over the years in the Lexus talking, coming and going to volleyball games, French, cooking classes, art classes, horse backing riding, learning to drive, and picking up new animals for the farm. Every moment is special with her!

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R. Moretti

I have some small scale reverse glass paintings by R. Moretti that I just adore.

Both are rural Italian scenes, a farm house in the background. I used to having these little gems beside my bed, when we lived in the city. I’m guessing they made a subconscious impact on us, since now we are people that have a town and country life. With all the heavy clads it reminds me of the end of summer, and beginning of the autumn is looming in the horizon.

I love how the artist made use of the light just breaking through the clouds, and the detail is amazing for such a small painting. One has touches of orange, indicating the poppies that are still in bloom. The other has a creek with a waterfall, with light bouncing on the rocks. I just love how paintings take us out of existence in this time and space, then transports us to another location. Well, of course, you have to be willing to use your imagination.

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Maryanne Jacobsen

“Great things are done by a series of small things brought together.” Vincent Van Gogh

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Maryanne Jacobsen is one of the few artists that I only own one piece of art from her body of works. I love this romantic piece in my living room. As the beautiful model takes her time in the garden to tend to her flowers. She is dressed in a vintage or antique dress with a red ribbon in her hair, and tends to red flowers, and finally there is a giant red bow on her back. Maryanne is directing our eyes to specific locations of the painting. Our subconscious mind looks at the red first, and then travels all over the painting. Her placement of the red in a triangle makes the most of canvas. Maryanne wants us to look at the at details and the nuances of the work.

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Old Venice

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This particular small pen and ink of Old Venice is one of my favorites. I purchased this from an obscure little antique shop, one day when I was out traveling around the SF Bay area. I’m not sure if the piece reminds me of the day or I just get swept up in the visual imperfections. I do remember that it was raining that day, and the kids had a minimum day (meaning they would get out early), so I went on a mission of discovery in the local antique shops. I got so caught up in looking, I was almost late for pick up time.

As far as the art work, I love that the artist uses only a few colors to tell the story. Relics in the foreground, with a couple waiting or enjoying the view of St. Marco across the lagoon. The reflection of the city in the water tells us that the water is still. Which may also reveal that this is probably spring, and still cold outside.

 

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Another Set of Twins

“Ideas are easy. It’s the execution of ideas that really seperate the sheep from the goats.” Sue Grafton

Starbright had the last set of twins for the season. This is the first time we have ever had goats so late in the season. One male and one female. The male has coloring like his mother, and our little female has coloring like her father. We named the little male Goofy, and the female is Belle. Since we have named all of our goats after Disney characters.

Belle is the little brown one all alone, and Goofy is going up to his mom, Starbright. Starbright is not loving to Belle, so she has to be fed by a bottle. We have to milk Starbright to feed Belle. We bottle fed the triplets earlier this year, and gave them formula, but they were just so damn small. The other goats that were getting their mothers milk were almost three times larger than the formula goats. It’s an experiment that we don’t want to repeat.

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You are the Result

“Walking. I am listening to a deeper way. Suddenly all my ancestors are behind me. Be still, they say. Watch and listen. You are the result of the love of thousands.” Linda Hogan

John Harris was my 14 great-grandfather, born in 1513 in Gloucestershire, England. His father was 38, and his mother, Johanna, was 38.

John Harris, a man of Hatherup, county of Gloucester, England, born as early as 1513 in England. He married Anne Annis about 1533. His will was dated October 22, 1553, and proved June 4, 1554. Left the lease of the house in which he dwelt to his daughter Alice Wynchcumbe (Winchkome, Winchcombe) and if she should die before it expired, the remainder of the term was to belong to her daughter. His two sons, William and John Harris, received seventy-two acres of land, a sheep pasture and also ten sheep and a bullock apiece. The residuary legatee and executrix was his wife Anne Harris. (Plus names of overseers and witnesses). The will of Annis Harris, widow, of Hatherup, was made June 17, 1585, and proved Feb. 5, 1585/6. She gave her daughter Alice Winchcombe a new gown, three sheets, etc. and made small personal gifts to Anne, James, John and Thomas Winchcombe, William, Anthony, and John Harris the younger and some friends. The residuary legatee and executor was Richard Harris. Note: Hatherup and Fairford, two neighboring parishes in the county of Gloucester, and the printed index of wills at Gloucester, containing references to several wills of Harrises of Hatherup brought the search to a satisfactory conclusion. Hatherup is situated on a hill rising from the valley of the river Coln in one of the most picturesque districts of Gloucestershire. The village itself is a mere appendage to the manorhouse, now called Hatherup Castle and the home of Sir Thomas Bazeley.

Created by: Marjorie Harris McLean Record added: Dec 07, 2013

 

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E. Heller

“A picture is a work of art, not because it is “modern,” not because it is “ancient,” but because it isa sincere expression of human feeling.” John F. Carlson

Was an artist from Paris, France, and this painting was done around 1899. IMG_9610

It depicts a cardinal playing the violin. Heller often depicts cardinals. I left it in the original frame, I loved the look of the antique, imperfect frame. I also adore seeing the folds of the fabric of his robes. The richness of the red, the light and shadow playing of the fabric. You can sense how heavy the fabric of the robe is, and the language of the robe being, the man wearing it is willing to spill his blood for the Pope. The heavy burden of bearing the weight is expressed in the robes. The Cardinal is caught in the middle of running his bow across the strings. The anticipation of the spectator is never quenched except in the imagination we are always waiting for the music to begin.