Category Archives: Genaolgy

Christopher Huntington and Ruth Rockwell

Christopher Huntington was born on July 25, 1624 to Simon Huntington and Margaret Baret. As a child of around nine years, his family emigrated to Windsor, Connecticut. His father died while crossing the ocean and was buried at sea.

Christopher married Ruth Rockwell, daughter of William Rockwell, a prominent and highly respected member of the community on October 7, 1652. Ruth was born on August 16, 1633 in Windsor, Connecticut. Christopher and Ruth moved to Saybrook, Connecticut probably in the spring of 1654 (because birth of one child appeared in the Windsor records in 1654, and the death of another appeared in May of 1654 in Saybrook). They stayed in Saybrook until the spring of 1660 when he and many of his fellow citizens organized themselves into a church lead by Reverend John Fitch.

They moved to the Valley of the Yantic (Connecticut). He and his brother, Simon, helped to lay the foundation of a community, which was later called Norwich. His name occurs often in the earlier records of this town, and always in honorable relations. His house lot was one of the prominent localities in the settlement. In 1668, the general court granted him 100 acres of land (not more than 20 acres of it meadow).

In 1678, he was appointed town clerk. In 1685, he was one of the 12 patentees of the new town of Norwich. In 1686, his name occurs as one of the committees “to make provisions for maintaining the Reverend Minister. He passed away in 1691 and his grave is unmarked.

His children: Christopher and Ruth, twins, died as children; Ruth Huntington married to Samuel Pratt; Christopher Huntington married to Mary Bushnell; Thomas Huntington married to Elizabeth Pratt Backas; John Huntington married to Abigail Lathrop; Lydia or Lydyah Huntington; Ann Huntington married Jonathan Bingham; Suzan Huntington married to Samuel Griswold. (Source information taken from Huntington Genealogical Memoir 1633 to 1915. Copy owned by Eva C. Johnson of Springville, UT)

John Huntington

John Huntington was born in Norwich, Connecticut to Christopher Huntington and Ruth Rockwell on March 15, 1666. He married Abigail Baker Lathrop on December 9, 1686. She was the daughter of Samuel Lathrop and Elizabeth Scudder and was born in May 1665. As the records show, John was a man who commanded the respect and esteem of his fellow townsmen. On Dec 21, 1691 he was appointed constable in Norwich.

We know very little else, except that he died between 1695 and 1703. Eva C. Johnson’s Huntington book (Springville, UT) lists his death date as October 4, 1696. We know that he had passed away by 1703 because the record of the General Assembly held at New Haven on October 1703 states the following, “This court doth remit to the widow Abigail Huntington, what is due from her estate to the colony by the seizure of the inspector of Norwich, what is due from her estate is left out of the list to now added.” Abigail was a widow for many years and died November 19, 1745.

Diaries and Journals

I can’t even begin to tell you the thrill that I get when I find someone in our family that has a diary or a journal. I have read a few journals of family members, and honestly…once I start reading the journal, I can’t stop. Usually, before I have been handed a journal or diary there is a preface of “there are lots of misspelled words or something to that effect”. I am not reading about a slice of their life without knowing that this person that wrote these words was doing so with little light, some education, and who knows how tired they were. Let’s not kid ourselves reading and writing before 1930 was done at leisure time. Some people had very little, if any leisure time.

If they had a farm, they had to think about their crop. Their crop was their livelily hood, without it they could not sustain themselves. The work was grueling, they were up with the light, and sometimes worked until they had no light. Children had to be taken care of, and the water had to be brought in the house. Animals had to be taken care of, and sometimes there was a crop grown just for the animals.

It is remarkable to me when I stumble on to a person that has something that has been treasured from one generation to another, even with misspellings and bad grammar. In the end that doesn’t matter, its the time they took from their day to give us a glimpse of their life. People they mention, sometimes there are recipes. I have a blueberry lemon cake in one journal that is so wonderful. They took the time to measure all the ingredients for the recipe to hand over to a daughter in law. It was a favorite of her son.

There is one heart wrenching journal that tells of a mom that lost her son. He didn’t die, he went on to disguise himself as an Italian. He was mixed with Black, Native American, and White. He found a job with some Italians that excepted him as he was, but he was infatuated with a girl. He told her he was Italian, and he moved up north to work in construction. His mom got the letter that he would never come back to see her because he didn’t see himself as the mix he was, but as an Italian. He wanted her to know how much he loved her, but hoped that she would understand. Her journal told of her heartbreak, and how she felt betrayed by her son. She would also write how much she loved him, and how her retreat was going down to the river to cry for the son she lost.

Another relative wrote about her family building a town, and having a saw mill. They also had an inn, and one day they found a pregnant run away slave. It was just before the civil war, and they brought her into their home. She would have a little girl and her name was Hazel. Mary and Hazel lived in the house with the family, and my great aunt was named after Hazel. This same family had arguments at the table about how to help the slaves and not helping the slaves. One of the older sons wanted to buy slaves from the market, and then free them once they have worked off what he had paid for the slave. His thought was, if they purchased the slaves and educated them they could have a good life. The father did not agree with the son. He said if they purchased slaves they would be contributing to more slaves being sold. Mary would often tell the family of her days in bondage, and how she was treated before she ran away. If the family were caught harboring a slave, the family would have had to relinquish Mary, as well as pay a $500 fine. During the civil war Mary and Hazel were sent up north, so they would not have to endure the war.

When you are lucky enough to come upon a diary or journal, treasure it! It will transport you to a place that you’ve never dreamed.

William Mobley Sr.

Jemima Mobley

Jemima Mobley was bon in 1745 in Broad River, Fairfield, South Carolina. Her parents were William Mobley Sr., born 1725. and her mother was Ann Osborne, born 1723. Jemima has a sister Keziah, born in 1747. Jemima Mobley.She was married to Edward Lovejoy in 1769. The two of them had 8 children.  In 1832 Jemima was chosen from a lottery for Cherokee Land, as part of the Georgia Cherokee Land Act in Georgia. She passed away  in 1838.

 

 

Edward Miles Lovejoy

Edward is my 5th great grandfather. He was born in 1777, in Fairfield, South Carolina. He was born to Edward Lovejoy and Jemima Mobley. Edward was 39, and Jemima was 32.

The family moved from South Carolina to Jasper, Georgia. In Georgia they owned a cotton farm. In 1809 Edward married Rachel Spear. Rachel dies after giving birth to their daughter. Edward then marries Mary Moate Weathersby from Maryland.

In 1820 Edward lived in Monticello, Jasper, Georgia. There were a total of 18 people living on his farm. Twelve were white people, and six were slaves. In 1832 the Lovejoy family was given a lottery of land. Land that was really owned by the Cherokee and Creek people. Tickets were pulled from giant barrels, and the land that the Cherokee and people were driven from for the gain of the government was given away to people so they could settle the property. The Supreme court decided to protect the lands for the native people, but President Andrew Jackson decided to forcibly remove the natives out west. Eight lotteries took place over a time of 28 years. Seventy five percent of the land had been distributed to “pioneers”, but the system was disbanded in 1833.

Land was distributed to able bodied “white men” that could afford to bring laborers to develop the land. The lotteries gave land to 100,000 families.

By 1860 there are no slaves. Edward dies at the age of 70.

 

Anderson Lovejoy

My fourth great grandfather. He was born in 1814, and the child of Edward Lovejoy  (he was 37)and Mary Moate Weathersby (she was 26). Anderson and Mary had 11 children. The two of them and their families witnessed “The panic of 1837”. Banks shut their doors, unemployment skyrocketed, it was an economic depression.

When he was 24 he married Elenor, then married Mary Ann Hatton when he was 29. In 1843 Anderson Married Mary Ann in Marion, Georgia. In 1845 they are back in Virginia. In 1847 the family goes bak to Georgia after the death of father of Anderson passes. By 1850 the family is back in Virginia.

In 1860 Anderson and his family lived on a farm, and he worked as a farmer in Virginia. During the Civil War, Anderson enlisted as a private in Company G, West Virginia 7th Cavalry Regiment to fight for the Union on January 20, 1862 for a three year term. In April 1862, Anderson was wounded in battle at Mud River. Anderson was admitted to the Hospital at Middletown on July 5, 1862. Anderson received a Disability Discharged on September 18, 1862 because he was unfit for duty for the past two previous months due to Sciatica. Sciatica refers to pain, weakness, numbness, or tingling in the leg. It is caused by injury to or compression of the sciatic nerve. He had been stationed at Fort McKinney in Maryland at the time of his discharge. He was 6′ .5″ tall, had a dark complexion, black eyes, dark hair and had been a farmer before joining the military.He applied for a Civil War Pension on April 16, 1877.

 

 

In 1870 he and his family are still working on the farm in Virginia. At 64 years old he is a mail carrier. In 1900 he is living with family in Georgia. in 1903 he passes, and is buried in Georgia.