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Henry Percy, 4th Earl of Northumberland

“History remembers the celebrated, genealogy remembers them all.” Laurence Overmire

My 16th Great Grandfather, starting from my grandfather and his mother, Alda Tribble.

 

HENRY PERCY, fourth Earl of Northumberland (1446-1489), was the only son of Henry Percy, third earl. On his father’s attainder, Edward IV committed him to safe keeping, and three years later conferred the forfeited earldom of Northumberland on John Neville, lord Montagu. Percy’s imprisonment cannot have been very strict, for in 1465 he was confined in the Fleet, where he made the acquaintance of John Paston (1421-1466), a fellow-prisoner (Paston Letters, ii. 237,243).

His subsequent transference to the Tower may be attributed to the Nevilles when they held the king in durance after the battle of Edgecott in 1469. One of Edward’s first steps on shaking off this constraint was to release Percy (27 Oct.), merely exacting an oath of fealty. When the final breach with the Nevilles came in the following spring, and the king drove the Earl of Warwickout of the realm, he took the earldom of Northumberland from Lord Montagu, and restored it (25 March at York) to Percy, who had accompanied him throughout the campaign. The new earl also superseded his disgraced rival in the wardenship of the east march towards Scotland, which had usually been held by the head of his house. This he lost again in the autumn, when the Nevilles restored Henry VI, and though Northumberland made no open resistance to the change of government, and could not very well be deprived of his newly recovered title, the Lancastrian traditions of his family did not blind him to the fact that for him it was a change for the worse.

On landing in Yorkshire in the following spring, Edward is said to have exhibited letters, under Northumberland’s seal, inviting him to return; and though he ‘sat still’ and did not join Edward, his neutrality was afterwards excused, as due to the difficulty of getting his Lancastrian followers to fight for York, and was held to have rendered ‘notable good service’ to the cause by preventing Montagu from rousing Yorkshire against the small Yorkist force. Twelve days after the battle of Barnet, Northumberland was created chief justice of the royal forests north of Trent by the triumphant Edward, and, after Tewkesbury, he was made constable of Bamborough Castle (5 June) and warden of the east and middle marches (24 June).

In the parliament of August 1472, the first held by Edward since his restoration of the earldom to Percy, the attainder of 1461 was formally abrogated. Shortly after the opening of the session Northumberland was appointed chief commissioner to treat with the Scots. Two years later he entered the order of the Garter, and was made sheriff of Northumberland for life. In 1475 he was given a colleague in his wardenship, in order that he might accompany the king in his expedition to France, and his presence is noted by Commines at the interview between Louis XIand Edward at Pecquigny. He led the van in the Duke of Gloucester‘s invasion of Scotland in June 1482, and Berwick, then recovered, was entrusted to his keeping.

Richard of Gloucester, when he assumed the protectorship, was careful to conciliate Northumberland by renewing his command as warden of the marches and captain of Berwick. A few weeks later the earl had no scruples in recognising Richard as king, and bore the pointless sword, curtana, the emblem of royal mercy, before him in the coronation procession. The office of great chamberlain of England, which the Duke of Buckingham forfeited by rebellion in October, was bestowed upon Northumberland (30 Nov. 1483), together with the lordship of Holderness, which had long belonged to the Staffords, and formed a desirable addition to the Percy possessions in Yorkshire. Richard gave him many offices of profit, and lands valued at nearly a thousand a year. Parliament restored to him all the lands forfeited by the Percy rebellions under Henry IV and not yet recovered.

Next to the Duke of Norfolk‘s, Richard bid highest for Northumberland’s loyalty. But he was not more ready to sink or swim with Richard than he had been with Edward. Some months before he landed in England, Henry of Richmond had entertained a suggestion that he should marry a sister-in-law of Northumberland. When the crisis arrived the earl obeyed Richard’s summons, and was at Bosworth, apparently in command of the right wing, but his troops never came into action; and, if Polydore [Vergil] may be believed, he would have gone over early in the battle had Richard not placed a close watch upon him.

Northumberland was taken prisoner by the victor, but at once received into favour and soon restored to all his offices in the north, and employed in negotiations with Scotland. In the spring of 1489 he was called upon to deal with the resistance of the Yorkshiremen to the tenth of incomes demanded for the Breton war. On 10 April he was appointed commissioner, with the archbishop of York and others, to investigate and punish the disturbances in York at the election of mayor in the previous February. Towards the end of the month he was alarmed by the attitude of the people in the vicinity of his manor of Topcliffe, near Thirsk, and on Saturday, 24 April, wrote to Sir Robert Plumpton from Seamer, close to Scarborough, ordering him to secretly bring as many armed men as he could to Thirsk by the following Monday. On Wednesday, 28 April, having gathered a force estimated at eight hundred men, he came into conflict with the commons, whose ringleader was one John a Chamber, near Thirsk, at a place variously called Cockledge or Blackmoor Edge, and was slain at the first onset. It was at first reported that he had gone out unarmed to appease the rebels. Some affirmed that over and above the immediate cause of collision the commons had not forgiven him for his conduct to Richard, who had been very popular in Yorkshire. Bernard Andreas wrote a Latin ode of twelve stanzas on his death, and Skelton wrote an elegy in English. He was buried in the Percy chantry, on the north side of the lady-chapel of Beverley Minster, where his tomb, from which the effigy has disappeared, may still be seen.

By his wife, Maud Herbert, daughter of William Herbert, first earl of Pembroke of the second creation, whom he married about 1476, he left four sons —Henry Algernon (1478-1527), his successor in the earldom; Sir William Percy; Alan; and Josceline, founder of the family of Percy of Beverley — and three daughters: Eleanor, wife of Edward Stafford, duke of Buckingham(beheaded in 1521); Anne, married (1511) to William Fitzalan, earl of Arundel (1483-1544); and Elizabeth, who died young.


 

Source:

Tait, James. “Henry Percy, Fourth Earl of Northumberland.”
The Dictionary of National Biography. Vol XLIV. Sidney Lee, Ed.
New York: Macmillan and Co., 1895. 408-409.

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Alphabet Fun

“New friends may be poems, but old friends are alphabets. Don’t forget the alphabets because you will need them to read the poems.” William Shakespeare

When my children were young every week we worked on a different letter of the week. The letter would be the focus for all our subjects. Cooking, Crafts, Botany, Zoology, Arts, Language and Fun were all center around one letter for each week. I started making plans for 3 years, so this would give us flexibility and would allow each week to be different.

Here is the alphabet cookie cutters we used…   These are stainless steel, and can be used for cooking and crafts. A great pleasure is they come in a canister, and then you can put them away! I love that!

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Give Us The Gold

“Nothing is impossible. With so many people saying it couldn’t be done, all it takes is an imagination” Michael Phelps

We have been giving everything we have to the winery. San Marcos Creek Vineyard and Winery has not even been known to the people of the county of San Luis Obispo. We have attended events, entered contests, given blood sweat and tears to every single day.

We finally got a little pay off from this journey when we entered the Los Angles International Wine Competition. We got 2 gold medals!! We scored a 95 out of 100 points, and Best in Class. Our Cabernet Sauvignon has been described as velvety smooth, fruit forward with dusty tannins.

Here is our bottle wearing her hardware…IMG_9635

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Come and Go

“Every oak started out as a couple of nuts who stood their ground” Henry David Thoreau

It’s always sad for us when we loose a tree. One of our oak trees that stood beside the house had to be cut down, and sawed to pieces. The ground squirrels made too many homes under the tree, and she became weak. She became so weak that one of her limbs just came crashing down on the sidewalk. Thank God, no one was around the house at the time. I came home to find the limb was just dead inside. We had someone come out to take a look at her, and tell us if she had a chance of survival.

The damage had already been done the tree was dead all the way though to the trunk. The best thing we could do is cut her down, and saw her to pieces. We did just that, and now the logs are still sitting on the farm.

I want to rent a chipper, put everything we can in there, and utilize the chips in the chicken houses. The chickens can use it as fluff material, then our old tree will become compost, eventually ending up fertilizing something on the farm…making her life come full circle, giving life to others organisms on the farm. IMG_9625

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Bill Rhea

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This is one of my favorite paintings in our family room. Bill execution of the painting shows he is heavy handed with the brush, and you really need to get close to the painting to see all the details that Bill wants to show you. The light and shadow playing on the walls of Sienna. You can almost make out the license number on the Fiat 500. The decorative iron hanger that a sign hangs from, on the forefront of the right hand side. A light on top of the sign is beautiful too.

The warmth from the color palate make it perfect for a wall space that is admired, you can stare at it instead of the window. The tower touching the perfect blue sky conjures up a warm spring day with the illusion of nothing going wrong. Just look into the painting and imagine the warm sun hitting your face, and taking in that moment of content.

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Morelli Family Sunday

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This is one of our favorite meals. The potatoes are really easy, peel your potatoes, set your oven to 400, add olive oil to the cookie sheet, some onions and red peppers and cook until tender. Cook your potatoes first!

The pork rolls are made from pork should cut in long thin strips, add your favorite seasoning. We prefer Tuscan or Italian seasoning, but plenty of cumin. Add bacon on the out side and inside of each strip, then roll tightly. Toothpick the roll together and bake them in the oven for about 30 mins at 400 degrees. You don’t want to make the roll too thick or the meat will not get done on the inside. Add red onions and sweet peppers to cookie sheet and you have a nice meal.

If I was going to have a wine with this one, I would choose our Merlot. Our Merlot is fruit forward and compliments the peppers and pork very nicely.

 

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Lady Johanna Percy/15th Great Grandmother

“All kings and queens are not born of royal bloodlines. Some become royal because of what they do once they realize who they are.” Pharrell Williams

Lady Johanna is another ancestor from Alda Tribble, the mother of my grandfather Ernest E Gray.

This is where Lady Johanna grew up…

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Lady Joan Percy, Lady, born Abt. 1460 in Alnwick Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England; died Aft. 1540 in Prittlewell, Essex, England. She was the daughter of 2. Lord Egremont 1st Thomas Percy, Lord Egremont and 3. Eleanor Harbottle. She married (1) John Harris Abt. 1477. He was born Bet. 1456 – 1467 in Prittewell, Essex, England, and died 08 June 1508 in Date of Will Prittlewell, Essex, England. He was the son of William Harris, Of Prittewell and Anne Jernegan. She married (2) Arthur Harris Abt. 1509 in Prittlewell, Essex, England. He was born Abt. 1456 in Prittlewell, Essex, England, and died Bet. 1538 – 1540 in England. He was the son of William Harris, Of Prittewell and Anne Jernegan.

More About Lady Joan Percy, Lady: 1: it is not proven that John and Arthur Harris md the same Joan Percy 2: 1558, Visitation 3: MAY BE D/O HENRY PERCY AND MAUD HERBERT? 4: film 1761147 (British Isles) Aka (Facts Pg): Johanne Percy Burial: St. Mary Church, Prittlewell, Essex, England LDS ID: 9LQ1-S3

More About Arthur Harris: 1: it is not proven that John and Arthur Harris md the same Joan Percy Aka (Facts Pg): Arthur Herris Burial: St. Mary Church, Prittlewell, Essex, England

Generation No. 2

2. Lord Egremont 1st Thomas Percy, Lord Egremont, born 29 November 1422 in Leconfield, Yorkshire, England (2nd son of Henry); died 10 July 1460 in Battle of Northampton. He was the son of Henry Percy, Earl Northumberland 2Nd and Eleanor Neville, Countess Northumberland. He married 3. Eleanor Harbottle Abt. 1455. 3. Eleanor Harbottle, born Abt. 1426 in Beamish, England (Northumberland)?; died 1483. She was the daughter of Richard Harbottle, Sir Knight and <Unnamed>.

More About Lord Egremont 1st Thomas Percy, Lord Egremont: Acceeded: 20 November 1449, Lord Egremont the First Note: Shown as 2nd child by Brian Tompsett

More About Eleanor Harbottle: 1: 1558, Visitation Daughter & coheir to Sir Richard Harbottel, Knight from visitation of Essex


Children of Thomas Percy and Eleanor Harbottle are: i. Lord Egremont 2nd John Percy, Lord Egremont 2Nd, born Abt. 1459 in Alnwick, Northumberland, England; died Bef. 21 March 1495/96. ii. Lady Joan Percy, Lady, born Abt. 1460 in Alnwick Castle, Alnwick, Northumberland, England; died Aft. 1540 in Prittlewell, Essex, England; married (1) John Harris Abt. 1477; married (2) Arthur Harris Abt. 1509 in Prittlewell, Essex, England.

Married:

  1. on Abt. 1490 in England to Arthur Harris (1475-1537), son of William Harris and Anne Jernegan.

Children of Johanna Percy and Arthur Harris are:

  1. William Harris, b. 1505, Southminster, England, d. 1556, Southminster, England.
  2. Alice HARRIS