Monthly Archives: September 2016

Winery Ducks

Recently, a lady brought over her rescue duck Aflac, and I want to tell you he has made friends with these two white ducks and the one black duck. These three were added recently by an unknown person. We happened to see the two white ones and the black one hanging out together. We do have several wild ducks that stop at the pond, and help the domesticated ducks finish their food at the end of the evening.

We are so happy that Aflac is adjusting to life at the winery.

Injuries on the Farm

 

Within a few weeks we had three injuries. Our miniature donkey, Ellie, got horned by one of the goats. A horn went through her temple. We called out Dr. Steve, and when he came out the first time, I could not catch Ellie. She ran all over the pasture. I even took carrots out to her, but she was too smart. Dr. Steve has given her shots before, so getting near her with him at the farm was a no go.

Dr. Steve finally told me…Kimberly, I have another appointment. I’ll swing back by around three. I finally caught her, and put her in one of the stables. He came back, gave her a shot, and cleaned, and added a paste to her wound.

The next week Salem escaped the stall where he and his brother live. He gashed his chin open, so Sabrina had to take him to the vet. Dr. Steve only takes care of “horns and hooves”, so she drove Salem to the vet to get stitches. He had to wear a cone for a week.

The very next day, Gucci went to doggie day spa. They discovered a growth on her hind leg. I picked her up from the spa that even and took her to the emergency vet hospital. She was in a cone for three days. One of the days she acted as “winery dog” for the day.

Everyone is on the mend, and doing much better!

Nun Playing A Violin

Although this is a print, it is an antique print. The original was a painting from the Italian Renaissance. The painter and subject are unknown. The face of the nun appears very young. Which is not a surprise, since families often sent a daughter to the convent. Often, the families just couldn’t afford a dowery for more than one girl, and sometimes they couldn’t afford one. A young woman would go to the convent ready to serve the church. Gardening, cleaning, praying, helping the poor. Mother Superior was in charge of the fate of the young lady.

This print reminds me of an educated lady, grieving for her family. Maybe it is an evening of a full moon where the light hits the courtyard just right, and the echo of her violin playing brings tears to the eyes of the other young ladies that have come to the convent. Young ladies that miss their families, and their old way of life.

Of course, there were young ladies that came to the convent and had a better life after they were surrounded by other young ladies. There would have been young ladies that would be able to eat good food once they were in the convent. I was once told that city poor was much different than country poor. If you were poor and lived in the city it was a little tougher to obtain fresh food. If you were poor in the country one could glean from neighboring farmers, there were eggs from chickens, and one could grow some of their own food.

Looking at old images really makes me grateful to live here and now. I am so thankful, and appreciate our ancestors, each and everyone of them. The lives they had were not easy! The choices they had to make were so different, and so far removed from the world we live in today.

Elizabeth Lovejoy

When Elizabeth Lovejoy was born in 1837 in Boone County, West Virginia, her father, Anderson, was 23 and her mother, Elenor, was 18. She had one son and five daughters with Luke G Adkins between 1857 and 1879.

America was her first born, 1857

Elizabeth would not have any children durning the civil war.

In 1866, she had a son, Benjamin F. Adkins. Another daughter in 1867, Mary A. Adkins. Barbery E. Adkins was born in 1870. Nancy Ellen was born in 1875. In 1879, her last daughter was born, and they named her Virginia F. Adkins.

Cesarina XVI

One of the things I told Cesarina was that she was unforgettable. She told me over the years she should have gotten an Oscar for all the things she has been though, and the government of the United States should thank her for contributing so much money to help  it run. We had good times, we had bad times, but we had time together, and maybe that is the lesson in all the lessons I had learned. Family is family, you take them the way you get them. We are all flawed, imperfect human beings that want to be loved by other human beings. We are granted time in this realm for a short period of time. We all may as well make the most of it. Drink fine wine, and listen to those that have something to teach. We may not know in the moment that they are teaching us, that is why we have to listen.

She made me promise to never forget to treat my daughter in law more fair. I promised her, I will treat her more fair, and I will remember that she is another member of the family. I believe Cesarina would be proud of all that we have accomplished! I learned so much about cooking Italian food, real estate, and the real value of family. Thank you, Cesarina, you may have given me so much more than you will ever know. There is a part of you that lives on in your son, and your grandchildren.

It’s never too late for that Oscar! 😉

Finally Done

San Marcos Creek Villa is done, and here are the results of all our hard work…

When Life Gives You Sh*t…

When life gives you sh*t, you make compost. Farm life isn’t always about the cute animals, they have a lot of crap. We compost all our garbage, and even the poo. Nothing, really goes to waste. LOL!

Not only do we compost, but we also have a vermicompost. What is vermicompost? So, we have been utilizing this system since our eldest child was 18months old. We wanted our children to understand the cycle of life, as well as start them young with finding an alternative to the landfill. This is such a great way to incorporate your shredded paper, coffee grounds, apple cores, banana peels, etc. I don’t mix the two systems. The animal waste products and the vermicompost.

The bigger pile has to be rotated, and it takes about a year to use in the garden. So, it may not be pretty, but it is a part of farm life. Sustainable practices like our grandparents and great grandparents used as they farmed. Caring for the land, and not striping the land. Every living thing is important, including the worms.

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